Category: Diet

Budget-friendly picnic popcorn makers

Budget-friendly picnic popcorn makers

Self-stirring Budget-friensly, stovetop, and Haircare sample discount theater—style maakers makers use of hot Wholesale grocery prices to cook kernels and have a stirring arm that keeps them in motion to heat evenly, prevent burning, and separate popped from unpopped kernels. Our Picks. Ecolution Micro-Pop Microwave Popcorn Popper. Budget-friendly picnic popcorn makers

Budget-friendly picnic popcorn makers -

Stirring popcorn makers more closely mimic cooking popcorn on the stovetop. They have a nonstick heating base with a stirring arm and require cooking oil to pop.

When you turn it on, the hot plate starts heating and the stirring arm moves the popcorn kernels and cooking oil around the base until the entire batch is popped. Quick, and with very few unpopped kernels, the Presto Poplite Air Popper and Dash Hot Air Popcorn Maker were extremely efficient.

With our winning air poppers, the popcorn immediately blew up a chute and out into a serving bowl, there was also no need to babysit each model to prevent burning. We also tested the Cuisinart Easy Pop Air Popper , but it was twice as slow and had 5. Both the West Bend Stir Crazy Popcorn Maker and Dash SmartStore made the crispest popcorn we tasted.

Each piece of popcorn from these models had a nice crackle and, as a bonus, neither of these models left any unpopped kernels. They were considerably slower than the top-performing air poppers, though.

While the West Bend finished batches in just under four minutes, the Dash stirring popcorn maker took almost six. And then there was the Cuisinart EasyPop Stirrer —its last kernels popped after almost seven minutes, taking so long that the bottom layer of popcorn started to burn.

With that much time under the lid, the popcorn began to steam and became chewy—and popcorn from the West Bend and Dash makers would likely have suffered the same fate if we hadn't flipped the bowls over just after the last kernels popped.

Popcorn relies on the moisture inside each kernel being heated until it becomes steam, which then causes it to pop open. The fastest popcorn makers made bigger, fluffier, tastier popcorn. All three of our winners showcased a nice corn-forward flavor profile.

The air-popped kernels from the Presto and Dash models were fluffy and light and finished full batches in under three minutes. The West Bend stirrer which had the highest wattage of any stirring model we tested produced crisp, crackly pieces in just under four minutes.

Salted batches scored slightly better than plain ones in the flavor category, but once you added butter, the subtleties between them were less apparent. None of the models we tested were able to melt butter straight from the fridge in the time that it took to pop, and only the butter warmer from Presto was able to pour melted butter without it dribbling.

The West Bend and Dash stirring poppers suggested adding butter to the top vent to melt over your popcorn while it stirred, but their manuals said you could only do so after they finished popping.

Putting butter on the vents allowed steam to build up, causing the popcorn to be soggy from the butter and chewy from the steam. Stirring popcorn makers use oil like stovetop popcorn makers to transfer heat to the kernels more efficiently than just the hot plate alone, but popping in oil also leaves their bowls and bases greasy.

The Dash stirring popcorn maker had some deep ridges around the vent holes where half-popped kernels got stuck, forcing us to dig around and fish them out before taking the bowls to the sink.

While the hotplates on the West Bend and Dash poppers were nonstick, they were also attached to the heating element, so you couldn't submerge them in water. Both manufacturers suggested wiping them clean with a rag, and while that worked just fine, the burnt oil in the Cuisinart model needed a good scrubbing to get clean.

In contrast, air poppers were a breeze to clean. Without any oil involved, all it took was wiping them off with a dishrag after they cooled down. If you do use the butter warmer, those were easy to hand-wash with warm, soapy water. The best popcorn makers are fast, popping full batches of popcorn in under three minutes for air poppers and under four minutes for stirring poppers.

They popped big, puffy popcorn without any burnt pieces and, finally, were easy to clean up afterward. What we liked: The Presto popped the fastest, and it also produced big, fluffy, tasty popcorn.

Overall, it was a great popcorn maker that was easy to use and easy to clean—what more can you ask for? It felt weird to shut it off by yanking the cord out of the wall.

What we liked: Only slightly slower and with a few more unpopped kernels than our top pick, the Dash air popper was another great option. We liked how the lid had notches that fastened it to the base, which was more secure than the other air poppers we tested. We also appreciated its power button, making it easy to turn it off when the batch was finished.

What we liked: This popper made the crispest popcorn we tasted, and it was also the fastest of all the stirring models. If you prefer crackle to your corn over big puffy pieces, this is a great option. The bowl got oily after each batch, and it took some elbow grease and dish soap to remove it fully.

We found that wiping it down with a paper towel was adequate, but if a batch ever burns it would be tough to scrub without getting it wet. Air poppers are relatively inexpensive, fast, and efficient. Because the hot air pops the corn so quickly, air poppers tend to produce big, fluffy popcorn that's ready for all sorts of inventive popcorn toppings.

Instead, we recommend melting butter in the microwave or on the stovetop and then drizzling it over a finished batch for better results.

Popcorn pops when the remaining moisture in a kernel heats up to the steam point, causing it to explode outwards, and air poppers work by heating the kernels directly. Popcorn can get chewy if it spends too much time steaming. Electric stirring popcorn makers have vents that help prevent steam from building up in the bowl, but you should immediately turn them off when a batch has finished and flip the popcorn out into a bowl.

Air poppers blow popped popcorn into a serving bowl right away, preventing it from being in contact with any steam. Use limited data to select advertising. Create profiles for personalised advertising.

Use profiles to select personalised advertising. Create profiles to personalise content. Use profiles to select personalised content. You can also pop the corn using almost any type of oil, which helps expand your flavor options. The vented top of the Stir Crazy's lid acts as a butter warmer, too; you can place slices of butter in it to melt and be stirred into the popcorn.

In practice, though, this didn't work very well. You're not supposed to add butter until after popping is complete, and in the time it took the butter to melt, the kernels started to steam and lose their crispness. You're probably better off melting butter in a separate vessel, and then pouring it in just as the corn finishes popping.

The other issue with this machine is that it's tough to clean. The hot plate winds up covered with grease and bits of corn and doesn't detach from the plug-in base, so you have to carefully wipe it down with a soapy sponge and can't rinse or submerge it.

No parts are dishwasher-safe. Dimensions: For a more traditional popcorn maker, we found that this stovetop model yields a close equivalent to movie theater popcorn—up to 6 quarts 24 cups of it, in just three minutes. This maker ranked high for its easy setup. During the popcorn-making process, we had to crank the wooden handle constantly to keep the kernels moving, so it was a very hands-on experience.

While we found it difficult to use the hand-crank mechanism at times, there were very few unpopped kernels at the bottom of the popper. It's also pretty easy to clean by hand.

Yes, this durable aluminum popcorn maker and a basic stovetop pot have a very similar mechanism for making popcorn, but we did love the final popcorn's slightly toasted flavor and the popper's ability to leave no unpopped kernels behind.

For an interactive, old-school experience, this is a good choice. The only potential downside is that you can't put any type of fat in the pot, even after cooking, which means more dirty dishes when transferring it into another pan or bowl to add butter or oil.

Dimensions: 6. If you really want to pull out all the stops and recreate movie theater magic at home, the Paragon Popcorn Machine can do the job. It's an old-fashioned style popper that has nostalgic flair thanks to the bright colors, scalloped top, and carnival lettering. The kettle drum can pop up to a full cup of kernels at a time, but the windowed cabinet can hold many batches while keeping everything hot and fresh thanks to the built-in warming deck.

Making popcorn in the machine is simple and straightforward. After adding kernels and oil to the kettle, lower the lid, flip a switch, and the machine will take care of the rest. A rotating mixer arm keeps the kernels moving to avoid burns. Once popped, the fluffy popcorn will spill out into the cabinet and with a twist of the handle, you can dump out the rest of the batch.

There are some small holes on the bottom of the cabinet tray that sift out annoying tiny pieces and the rare un-popped kernel so all that's left in the cabinet is picturesque popcorn. It may take slightly longer to pop than other models, but to me it is well worth the wait.

And careful around the kettle, it gets pretty hot! The hard-coated aluminum kettle and tempered glass panels are both sturdy and easy to clean. We do recommend regularly wiping down all parts to keep them from getting too greasy. It's certainly pricier than other models, but for the overall capacity, presentation, and ability to pop nearly every kernel, it is a winner.

Paragon's Popcorn Machine is perfect for sleepovers, family gatherings, and mega movie marathons. Our overall favorite model is the electric Presto Poplite , which can make up to 18 cups of air-popped corn in under three minutes. If you prefer the convenience of the microwave, try the simple, collapsible HotPop.

This roundup combines results from three separate tests of popcorn makers, one with six electric machines, one with 10 microwave and stovetop models, and a third with 11 makers of all kinds. In each set of testing, we made two batches in each machine, following its included directions and using the maximum amount of popcorn.

We measured the amount of time it took to finish each batch and counted the number of unpopped kernels left behind.

In addition, we rated each batch of popped kernels on crispiness and flavor, taking note of soggy, chewy texture and any plasticky or burnt flavors. For machines with butter-melting accessories, we tested those and noted how long it took butter to melt and how well it was incorporated into the popcorn.

We rated the machines as well for ease of setup, use, and cleaning, noting any special advantages and disadvantages. We did not consider price until after making all of our other ratings.

Most of the makers we tested have a capacity of half a cup of unpopped kernels, which doesn't sound like much but turns into as much as 18 cups popped.

If you're going to be making a lot of popcorn, there are larger-capacity poppers, but you should also consider how easy it is to make multiple batches in a row. Some makers can dump out a load of popped corn and start right over, while others need cleaning or cooling down before refilling.

All you need to make popcorn is corn and heat, but there are a lot of ways to heat the corn, each with its own pros and cons. Air poppers use only hot air and work quite effectively at popping almost every kernel, but you can't add any oil, butter, or seasonings during cooking.

Self-stirring electric and manual-stirring stovetop models both work in similar ways, constantly moving the corn as it cooks to ensure even heating and separate popped from unpopped kernels.

These let you use any oils and seasonings you like but tend to make slightly less crisp popcorn. Microwave poppers contain the corn in a typically silicone container while it heats and pops.

Microwave results can vary; it takes some experimenting to figure out the right power setting and amount of time for your oven. Making popcorn is a simple task without too much cleaning required. Few models are dishwasher-safe, but the worst you need to deal with is some grease that should wipe away with a soapy sponge.

Electric poppers need special care, as you don't want to get any water in the motors and heating elements; check the manual for specific directions. Two popcorn makers that can cook the exact same amount per batch can be wildly different in size. Microwave poppers tend to be the most compact, especially ones that collapse down for storage.

Electric machines that incorporate a heating element and possibly a fan are quite a bit bigger, but they also don't require a separate microwave oven. Depending on how often you make popcorn, you may want to keep one of these on the counter or tucked away in a cabinet—if it fits.

Stovetop popcorn makers don't vary much in size, roughly equivalent to a medium-to-large saucepan. You could use the pot without its stirring lid for everyday cooking, but the material tends to be cheap aluminum that's not great at transferring heat.

The exact method of popping depends on the type of popcorn maker you buy, but they all heat up corn kernels to around degrees, the point at which their husks burst and they turn into light, crunchy flakes.

Self-stirring electric, stovetop, and movie theater—style popcorn makers use of hot oil to cook kernels and have a stirring arm that keeps them in motion to heat evenly, prevent burning, and separate popped from unpopped kernels.

Hot air makers blow hot air through the kernels to both cook and separate the popped ones. They're very easy to use and don't require any oil but also can't use any oil if you want to add it for flavoring. Microwave poppers use a microwave to heat the kernels, of course, and can use oil or not depending on your preference.

First off, check the user manual for cleaning instructions for your specific model. Before cleaning, you should also be sure the machine is completely cool, turned off, and unplugged if applicable.

The goal is to remove any grease and leftover bits of popcorn, but most machines don't need very serious scrubbing. Some models have dishwasher-safe parts, but if you have to wash them by hand, all you'll need is a sponge, soap, and water. With electric machines you can still wipe with a sponge, but it's very important not to let the base get immersed in water or let water pour into any cord seams or other openings.

Even if your popcorn machine doesn't get too dirty, it's a good idea to clean it soon after each use; grease will get sticky and harder to remove if it sits for a long time. Movie theater—style popcorn makers take the most effort to clean.

The kettle can be wiped with paper towels between uses to remove oil residue, and the interior can be periodically washed with warm, soapy water to remove oil buildup. Some, but not all. You need at least a little oil with a stovetop, self-stirring, or movie theater—style machine, as it helps transmit heat to the kernels more effectively.

On the other hand, you should never use oil in an air popper; nothing but popcorn is supposed to go in its cooking chamber. With a microwave popcorn maker, you can use oil or not, though adding a teaspoon or so will help get more of the kernels to pop.

Oil is used for cooking, but it can also contribute to flavor: Try cooking popcorn in coconut, sesame, or extra-virgin olive oil, and you might not need to add any butter. It's not necessarily healthier especially if you add tons of butter and salt , but homemade popcorn does give you control over what's in your snack.

Store-bought microwave or pre-popped popcorn is apt to contain artificial flavors, preservatives, and other chemicals that aren't in homemade. There's also the issue of PFAS, so-called "forever chemicals" often used in packaging.

These are found in the linings of many microwave popcorn bags, and a recent UCLA study found that people who eat more microwave popcorn have more PFAS in their systems.

The author of this piece, Collier Sutter , personally tested popcorn makers in our Lab to determine the best picks to recommend, replicating the same recipes and measuring specific data points. She also included insights from our freelance reviewers to get the home cook's perspective.

This roundup was updated by Sharon Lehman , a home cook who happens to be a registered dietitian nutritionist; Allison Wignall , who takes her popcorn very seriously, even taste-testing the best popcorn seasonings for The Spruce Eats; and Jason Horn , whose earliest memory is crawling around on the kitchen floor eating popcorn after his great-grandma loaded too many kernels in the air popper while she was babysitting.

Allison Wignall is a staff writer for The Spruce Eats who focuses on product reviews. Use limited data to select advertising. Create profiles for personalised advertising.

Use profiles to select personalised advertising. Create profiles to personalise content. Use profiles to select personalised content. Measure advertising performance. Measure content performance. Understand audiences through statistics or combinations of data from different sources.

Develop and improve services. Use limited data to select content. List of Partners vendors. Small Appliances. The 5 Best Popcorn Makers of Make the iconic movie theater snack in the comfort of your own home. By Collier Sutter. Collier Sutter.

Enter to win samples Rocky Mountain Roll cares about your safety, all of our uBdget-friendly and inflatables Wholesale grocery prices cleaned Budget-friendly picnic popcorn makers picnicc use and plpcorn secured properly before every use. Canopies and tents make a great addition to any outdoor event. They are a good way to stay out of the sun or bad weather. They are perfect for weddings, school dances, or corporate parties. As of July 1,Rocky Mountain Roll will no longer be offering canopies larger than 10x10 for our events.

Budget-friendly picnic popcorn makers -

If you're going to be making a lot of popcorn, there are larger-capacity poppers, but you should also consider how easy it is to make multiple batches in a row. Some makers can dump out a load of popped corn and start right over, while others need cleaning or cooling down before refilling.

All you need to make popcorn is corn and heat, but there are a lot of ways to heat the corn, each with its own pros and cons. Air poppers use only hot air and work quite effectively at popping almost every kernel, but you can't add any oil, butter, or seasonings during cooking.

Self-stirring electric and manual-stirring stovetop models both work in similar ways, constantly moving the corn as it cooks to ensure even heating and separate popped from unpopped kernels.

These let you use any oils and seasonings you like but tend to make slightly less crisp popcorn. Microwave poppers contain the corn in a typically silicone container while it heats and pops.

Microwave results can vary; it takes some experimenting to figure out the right power setting and amount of time for your oven. Making popcorn is a simple task without too much cleaning required. Few models are dishwasher-safe, but the worst you need to deal with is some grease that should wipe away with a soapy sponge.

Electric poppers need special care, as you don't want to get any water in the motors and heating elements; check the manual for specific directions. Two popcorn makers that can cook the exact same amount per batch can be wildly different in size. Microwave poppers tend to be the most compact, especially ones that collapse down for storage.

Electric machines that incorporate a heating element and possibly a fan are quite a bit bigger, but they also don't require a separate microwave oven.

Depending on how often you make popcorn, you may want to keep one of these on the counter or tucked away in a cabinet—if it fits. Stovetop popcorn makers don't vary much in size, roughly equivalent to a medium-to-large saucepan.

You could use the pot without its stirring lid for everyday cooking, but the material tends to be cheap aluminum that's not great at transferring heat. The exact method of popping depends on the type of popcorn maker you buy, but they all heat up corn kernels to around degrees, the point at which their husks burst and they turn into light, crunchy flakes.

Self-stirring electric, stovetop, and movie theater—style popcorn makers use of hot oil to cook kernels and have a stirring arm that keeps them in motion to heat evenly, prevent burning, and separate popped from unpopped kernels. Hot air makers blow hot air through the kernels to both cook and separate the popped ones.

They're very easy to use and don't require any oil but also can't use any oil if you want to add it for flavoring. Microwave poppers use a microwave to heat the kernels, of course, and can use oil or not depending on your preference.

First off, check the user manual for cleaning instructions for your specific model. Before cleaning, you should also be sure the machine is completely cool, turned off, and unplugged if applicable. The goal is to remove any grease and leftover bits of popcorn, but most machines don't need very serious scrubbing.

Some models have dishwasher-safe parts, but if you have to wash them by hand, all you'll need is a sponge, soap, and water. With electric machines you can still wipe with a sponge, but it's very important not to let the base get immersed in water or let water pour into any cord seams or other openings.

Even if your popcorn machine doesn't get too dirty, it's a good idea to clean it soon after each use; grease will get sticky and harder to remove if it sits for a long time.

Movie theater—style popcorn makers take the most effort to clean. The kettle can be wiped with paper towels between uses to remove oil residue, and the interior can be periodically washed with warm, soapy water to remove oil buildup. Some, but not all. You need at least a little oil with a stovetop, self-stirring, or movie theater—style machine, as it helps transmit heat to the kernels more effectively.

On the other hand, you should never use oil in an air popper; nothing but popcorn is supposed to go in its cooking chamber. With a microwave popcorn maker, you can use oil or not, though adding a teaspoon or so will help get more of the kernels to pop.

Oil is used for cooking, but it can also contribute to flavor: Try cooking popcorn in coconut, sesame, or extra-virgin olive oil, and you might not need to add any butter. It's not necessarily healthier especially if you add tons of butter and salt , but homemade popcorn does give you control over what's in your snack.

Store-bought microwave or pre-popped popcorn is apt to contain artificial flavors, preservatives, and other chemicals that aren't in homemade. There's also the issue of PFAS, so-called "forever chemicals" often used in packaging. These are found in the linings of many microwave popcorn bags, and a recent UCLA study found that people who eat more microwave popcorn have more PFAS in their systems.

The author of this piece, Collier Sutter , personally tested popcorn makers in our Lab to determine the best picks to recommend, replicating the same recipes and measuring specific data points.

She also included insights from our freelance reviewers to get the home cook's perspective. This roundup was updated by Sharon Lehman , a home cook who happens to be a registered dietitian nutritionist; Allison Wignall , who takes her popcorn very seriously, even taste-testing the best popcorn seasonings for The Spruce Eats; and Jason Horn , whose earliest memory is crawling around on the kitchen floor eating popcorn after his great-grandma loaded too many kernels in the air popper while she was babysitting.

Allison Wignall is a staff writer for The Spruce Eats who focuses on product reviews. Use limited data to select advertising. Create profiles for personalised advertising. Use profiles to select personalised advertising. Create profiles to personalise content.

Use profiles to select personalised content. Measure advertising performance. Measure content performance. Understand audiences through statistics or combinations of data from different sources. Develop and improve services. Use limited data to select content. List of Partners vendors.

Small Appliances. The 5 Best Popcorn Makers of Make the iconic movie theater snack in the comfort of your own home.

By Collier Sutter. Collier Sutter. Her work has appeared in many publications including Architectural Digest, People Magazine, House Beautiful, Delish, Eat This, Not That! Learn about The Spruce Eats' Editorial Process. Our Top Picks. Best Overall:. Best Microwave:.

Best Self-Stirring:. Best Stovetop:. Best Movie Theater—Style:. Joseph · St. Custom Popcorn Machine. BUY NOW. Custom Popcorn Bags. Custom Branding Popcorn Machine. Popcorn bags that can be customized with your logo or with special coupon offers carry your marketing message and your marketing dollars even further.

Custom Printed Popcorn Bags Enhance Your Marketing Message. Any Place Where Your Target Audience Gathers! Sound : The high energy popping sound of popcorn kernels bursting into bloom.

Smell : The tantalizing smell of freshly popped popcorn. Taste : The delicious taste of warm, buttery popcorn. Touch : Patrons carry their custom printed bag with your logo and marketing message, enforcing your brand as they travel through the event.

Local Contact Numbers. Email: support promotionstore. Company Info Contact Us About Us FAQs Payment Options Privacy Policy Follow Us. Popular Links Catalog Request Monthly Specials Refer a Friend! Trade Shows Attractions Trade Shows Marketing TradeShow.

news Business Events Healthcare Industry Automotive Dealers Banks Credit Unions Mobile Event Marketers Casino Promo Departments Convention Show Marketers Radio TV Broadcast Stations. Having a face painter, airbrush tattoo artist, or henna tattoo artist at your graduation party would allow your guests to be a part of the fun.

We also have themed entertainers for your events. There are so many different options available when looking for an entertainer. Our Event Rental section offers many different odds-and-ends that can help make your party or event a success.

Often, it is the little details that put a polished finish on your event. Our trained representatives can help you determine if your event would benefit from our event rentals and can even suggest those things that will make your event unforgettable.

Because we care about your image, Rocky Mountain Roll takes care to make sure all of our event rentals are clean, presentable, and in great working order before every event.

Each item is clean and disinfected after use for the safety of your guests. They are the cleanest fun around! Is there a more fun party-starter than a giant pile of bubbles to dance or play in?

A foam party is one where you and your guests dance or play in bubbles created by one of our amazing machines. They have taken place at concerts, festivals, dances, birthday parties, school carnivals, and more! These parties can happen outdoors, or indoors.

The foam is a water-based product therefore indoor floors will be wet and slippery. Because safety is our highest priority, our experienced staff can help you plan for this when you call to book your event. Rocky Mountain Roll offers two options when booking one of these parties: Our Foam Cannon is meant for your small to medium parties, outdoor events, and events on a budget.

It fits well in smaller spaces and projects a stream of bubbles up to 25 feet and can be aimed to fill a certain space. Our Foam Machine Extreme is an extreme experience to the max. This large machine must be mounted or flown hung from a ceiling, in a tent, or other such structure to build up the massive piles of foam.

This machine is meant for your larger events and maximum bubble fun. Or seen it added to a Disc Jockey package for an unforgettable event. Call today to book your foam party today and let us help you find the perfect experience to fit your needs.

Game rental is one of Rocky Mountain Roll's specialties. Adding games at your backyard BBQ, corporate event, or even wedding is a great way to keep your guests engaged and celebrating.

Games bring out the competitive and team-building nature in most people, therefore renting games for corporate activities is a great idea. Plan a company cornhole competition, or ping pong party.

Renting games for your themed event is a perfect way to include even more fun. We offer a variety of sports-themed items for the super-competitive.

Similarly, there are some great summer games like water balloon volleyball, tug-o-war, and leaky bucket races for picnic fun.

Get spike ball, volleyball, horseshoes, or even ladderball for your backyard party. All these games are a huge hit with children and adults alike. These, along with our amusements, really makes it a party!

Games are great entertainment and a way to keep your party guests involved and having fun. Take a look through what we offer and see if the one you want is there!

Games make great team-building activities for corporate picnics, retreats, summer camps, birthday parties, graduation parties, and more.

When you need a generator to bring power for your event, this is the place to come! Rocky Mountain Roll offers many different sizes and options to provide the spark to run your event.

Many parks and outdoor venues require you to bring your own generator, rather than tie into their power. If you need a bounce house or jump house inflated, a PA system powered, or a large event up and running, we can help. Our experienced party professionals can help you learn what you need and provide solutions for large and small events.

Our giant games are so much fun for anyone who plays. Or attempt not to topple a Giant Jenga tower while strategically pulling pieces away?

These games fit well into corporate parties, graduation events, birthday parties, and casual picnic or BBQ entertainment. Easy to setup and use, and great for all ages. Bounce Houses or Jumphouses are the most popular inflatable to rent.

They make birthday parties exciting whether at home or at a park. Corporate events would not be the same without them. Rocky Mountain Roll offers a good selection of themes and options to fit any budget.

Our jumphouses are always clean, in good repair, and made of the highest quality, lead-free vinyl, therefore you can count on them to be inflated during your entire rental. We sanitize our jumphouses with every rental and make sure they are secured properly to prevent safety issues.

We have a huge selection of colorful table cloths, linen rentals, and anything you need to take your event up to the next level. We have both table rentals and tablecloth rentals. We have several different obstacle courses to offer for birthday parties, corporate events, graduation parties, and any other event.

All of our inflatables are sanitized at each event and secured safely by our setup crew. Enjoy running through the obstacles, sliding down slides, and racing to beat your opponent through.

We even have a mini obstacle course for the younger guests to enjoy. Large obstacle course inflatables offer more interaction and can be a fun way for kids to race each other and get a lot of energy out.

Rent huge inflatables like these obstacle courses to really impress your guests! We offer a variety of event services to help your party go off without a hitch. Looking for a decorator? Hoping to get some aerial footage of the event? Need some CAD event design done? You've come to the right place.

If you don't see the service that you need, just let us know and we will see what we can do. Every event needs a place for your guests to sit and socialize, or eat the food that has been provided. If it's a backyard barbecue, a wedding reception, or a company picnic, people need a place to rest.

Rocky Mountain Roll offers a wide selection of tables for rent in various sizes and shapes including cocktail, round, banquet, conference, and even serpentine shaped. If you are catering an event or having a wedding or graduation party, table rental is needed. Don't forget to add chairs and linens to complete your party rentals.

We offer a large variety of colors and styles, as well as the finishing touches like table runners, napkins, and even chair coverings for a polished, fancy look.

One call to Rocky Mountain Roll is all you need to start and finish your party rental experience. If you have powered speakers , then you can rent our amplifiers to make sure your speakers perform great at your event.

Cords, cables, power strips and everything else you might need for your event with music. Order one of our DJ packages , and we'll bring everything that is needed. click here to set an event time so you can see a more accurate price for this item.

click here to provide information required for pricing. In stock white or black. Extra cleaning charges due to stains, wax, etc. or replacement cost if damaged may apply to linen rentals.

White in stock. Additional colors and patterns available for special order. Table not included. Half length linen for a 6'x30" or 8'x30" banquet table. Available in a variety of colors. Each kit makes up to 8 servings.

Come in increments of 50 bags. Measures 33" tall x 39" long x 22" wide. Please submit a quote or contact us to be sure we service your area. Rocky Mountain Roll was founded in , giving us over thirty-nine years of entertaining in the Treasure Valley and the Northwest.

Many of our past clients can now be called friends—and we count that as a very important thing. Copyright © All Rights Reserved Rental Software Powered By EventOffice.

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