Category: Family

Discounted pantry staples

Discounted pantry staples

Dried oats, panhry, and other whole grains should be staples too. Taco Shells. Fresh garlic is usually preferred, but any garlic will work to pack in the flavor.

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PANTRY STAPLES FOR EASY MEALS: STAPLE INGREDIENT MEALS YOU NEED IN YOUR PANTRY

Sep 11, FoodAffordable seasonal dishes Cooking. We asked and you panrty. Today, we've got the top Doscounted staples from patry loyal followers AKA Freebsplus their favorite ways to use them… Score!

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Stzples grand total of Freebs voted these as their top pantry staples. Crazy, huh? Read on to learn what pahtry favorite xtaples are. Rice is one panry those Duscounted staples that pretty much goes with anything! It's a great way to stretch a Dlscounted, especially xtaples you have some ravenous teenagers or toddlers!

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This pantry staple is Cheap dairy-free baby food one that will Disvounted with just about anything and it's cheap and easy to keep on hand. Pro Tip: When you're cooking pasta, don't use oil in your water for boiling. A lot of Freebs keep canned pasta sauce on hand as it pairs naturally with pasta.

It's a pantry staple that is pretty cheap to stock up on and can go in lots of different things! Pro Tip: Pasta sauce is basically canned tomato sauce and some seasonings, so stock up on tomato sauce and you can easily make your own pasta sauce in a pinch!

Tomatoes are another pantry staple that a lot of Freebs keep on hand! Whether they're canned tomatoes, or tomato paste or sauce, there are so many different recipes you can make with them!

Don't be afraid to doctor your tomato sauces with fresh herbs, garlic, cheeses, or thickeners to get the results you want. You can even combined tomato sauce with paste for a slightly different take that uses up both ingredients.

Now that you have some ideas about how to use up those delicious canned and jarred tomato soups, sauces, and pastes, let's talk beans! Whether they're canned or whole, beans are good for so many things!

Eat them plain, add them to meat to bulk up the meal, add them to a soup…. Those are just a few of the reasons that beans are one of the top pantry staples for the Freebs!

You can even use your leftover canned beans in easy peasy dishes like my tamale casserole! Beans are a delicious filler and add protein and other nutrients! These soups are so good to have on hand. They go with pretty much anything and can really help to take a few ingredients from being a random assortment of items to a casserole in no time!

Pro Tip: It is beyond easy to make your own cream of chicken soup if you keep broth on hand — just add milk, flourand a little seasoning! Genius, right!? These are an obvious pantry staple! They're great to have by themselves as a side or added to a recipe.

Pro Tip: To improve the flavor of canned vegetables, first rinse them in a colander under cold water. Then add to your recipes as usual. Whether it's beef, chicken, or vegetable, broth and stock are great pantry staples to keep on hand!

Just buy the biggest carton or whatever is cheapest that you can find if you use it a lot. Be sure to refrigerate it after opening so it doesn't go bad! Pro Tip: I like to buy Better Than Bouillon from Costco.

It's amazing and lasts a while! Oatmeal is such a versatile pantry staple! It can either be eaten on its own or easily goes into so many kinds of recipes, from early morning breakfast to dessert.

Did you know that an ounce package of Old Fashioned Quaker Oats contains roughly 26, rolled oats? That's a lot of oats! Canned chicken, tuna, salmon, ham, and beef are all great ways to keep meat on hand without having to worry about the electricity going out and your meat ruining!

These pantry staples are so versatile and work in a lot of different meals. Pro Tip: If you're cooking the canned meats in a recipe, make sure you don't add it in until the very end.

Your goal is to heat it up, not cook it and dry it out! Alright, well there you have it! The top 10 pantry staples according to you fabulous Freebs. If you're just getting started, you might find that these are excellent staples to build up in your pantry so you can shelf cook like a pro!

For a more comprehensive list of what to stock in your pantry, check out our pantry staples post on our shelf cooking site! The brand new ShelfCooking. com site is dedicated to helping you cook delicious, homemade, down-home-cooked meals for your family without spending too much time in the kitchen!

Basically every parent's dream, right? Join our Shelf Cooking Community today! Your email address will not be published. Submit Comment. Top Pantry Staples to Help Save Money from YOU — Our Freebs Sep 11, FoodShelf Cooking.

LEARN MORE HERE! Submit a Comment Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

: Discounted pantry staples

More Preparedness Posts Store dried wild mushrooms in airtight containers in a dark cool place like your pantry. Processed nut butters, such as peanut butter, last longer in the pantry than nuts — up to a year for an unopened jar and a few months after opening. Oatmeal is such a versatile pantry staple! Department of Agriculture warns against exposing cans to extreme temperatures and recommends discarding dented or bulging cans. Table of Contents Toggle Cheap Pantry Staples Carbohydrates Condiment Protein Vegetables Honorable Mentions.
Stock Your Pantry on a Budget

This is a big one for those who frequent Whole Foods! Or if you do love Whole Foods, go there for your must-haves but shop the cheaper places for the staples that are the same store to store. Be prepared to put in a little work to make this happen, Kylee says.

That means you should look for sales, look up new recipes, make a shopping list, and start utilizing things that have been collecting dust in your pantry. They are flash frozen at peak ripeness anyway and just as healthy if not more healthy!

Especially on non-perishables that last a while, or starches like potatoes. The more you stick to this rule, the more you start realizing how the prices fluctuate month after month. Most of the time, not wasting money is a balancing act of getting creative in the kitchen while not wasting any food.

Before you go, check out our book, Becoming A Consummate Athlete. Read more in our privacy policy. Check your inbox or spam folder to confirm your subscription. Read our privacy policy for more info.

Molly Hurford is a journalist in love with all things cycling, running, nutrition and movement-related. She also writes regularly for publications including Bicycling magazine, Outside, Map My Run, and Nylon. Molly is a little obsessed with getting people—especially women—psyched on adventure and being outside, and she regularly hosts talks and runs clinics for cyclists and teaches yoga online and IRL… And in her spare time, the former Ironman triathlete and cyclist now spends time racing ultra-runs on trails.

Follow her on Twitter and Instagram at mollyjhurford. Want to stay in touch and talk all things outdoorsy? Theme by HB-Themes. Buy in bulk if you can Especially on non-perishables that last a while, or starches like potatoes. Rice, quinoa and other grains provide a delicious base for a healthy meal.

Brown rice is higher in fiber than white rice and provides slow-digesting carbohydrates that give you lasting energy throughout the day. Quinoa is an excellent gluten-free option that also contains more protein than most other grains — making it an ideal source of plant-based protein.

Dried and canned beans and lentils provide a great source of plant-based protein, fiber, B vitamins, magnesium and folate. They are also an economical way to add diverse flavors, textures and nutrition to dishes.

Nuts and seeds are a great source of healthy fats and fiber to help keep you full. Nuts like almonds, walnuts, or cashews make great snacks and can be included in trail mixes, added to stir-fries and sprinkled on salads.

Stock different seeds as well like flaxseeds, pumpkin seeds, and chia seeds that are a great source of fiber, protein, omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients.

Dried fruits contain fiber and are a great source of antioxidants. Packaged foods that are minimally processed and come in cans, jars or pouches are an important part of a healthy pantry, and can be the backbone of a healthy meal.

This includes foods like canned tomatoes, nut butters, chicken stock, canned meats, olives and more. Keeping a variety of baking supplies on hand makes it easy to whip up homemade versions of baked goods, instead of relying on packaged versions.

Having a variety of both whole-grain and grain-free flours is helpful, as well as other additions like cocoa powder and real vanilla. Condiments add extra flavor to meals, but most store-bought versions are filled with unhealthy additives and unwanted sugar.

Look for condiments with short ingredient lists and minimal preservatives. Healthy oils are an important pantry staple to use for cooking and preparing foods. Stock up on heart-healthy oils like olive oil, avocado oil and coconut oil, and avoid seed oils like canola or soybean oil.

Vinegars are helpful for making homemade salad dressing and adding acid to balance flavors. We know that eating a lot of sugar is not healthy, but having some better sweeteners on hand will help you make healthier versions of sweet treats!

Maple syrup and honey are less processed than regular sugar and contain more healthful nutrients. Coconut sugar and raw sugar are less refined than white sugar.

Keeping a variety of spices in your cabinet will help you add intriguing flavors to your meals — as well as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory properties and other health benefits.

Here are a few tips for saving money on healthy food for your pantry:. Micaela Preston is natural living educator and safe and sustainable product activist. She has spoken at conferences and events, has lobbied for safer chemical laws, and has consulted with many brands and businesses.

Her book, Practically Green: Your Guide to Eco Friendly Decision Making was published in Your email address will not be published. Click here for more information about working with me. Skip to primary navigation Skip to main content Skip to primary sidebar Skip to footer About About Mindful Momma Contact Work with Me My Book Privacy Policy Get Started Start Here Mindful Momma Mailing List FREE Sustainable Swaps Guide Resource Library Subscribers only Lifestyle Lifestyle Info Healthy Home Zero Waste Reusable Products Sustainable Fashion Food Healthy Food Recipes Health Remedies Products Non-Toxic Product Guides Non-Toxic Beauty Non-Toxic Cleaning Non-Toxic Kitchen Non-Toxic Home Non-Toxic Baby Non-Toxic Mattresses Brand Reviews Do It Yourself DIY Beauty DIY Cleaning Crafts Shop Marketplace Non-Toxic Product Guides Eco-Friendly Brands Guide Green Cleaning Kickstart Easy Home Detox Online Course Mindful Momma Digital Products.

Search this website. brown rice quinoa farro oats old fashioned or steel cut. whole grain pasta dried beans and lentils canned beans. nuts almonds, walnuts, pecans etc… sunflower seeds pumpkin seeds flaxseed meal. hemp hearts chia seeds dried coconut dried fruit apricots, dates, prunes etc….

Pantry Staples Under $—That Can Feed Hungry Athletes for a Week - Consummate Athlete

To discourage pests, keep cornmeal in the freezer for up to one year. A variety of oils and vinegars are essential to any well-functioning kitchen. Whether you use them for stir fries or in marinades or dressings, it's important to have cooking oil options.

Store vegetable oils in the original bottles, unrefrigerated, in a cool, dark place for up to six months. Refrigerate nut oils such as walnut oil , and use within three months. Do not store oils next to the stove.

Keep all types of vinegar in their original bottles, and store them in a cool spot for up to one year. Maintain a well-rounded collection of the spices , herbs, and seasonings you use most frequently—choices will vary from household to household, but every cook relies on them to elevate or enhance a dish.

Most spices will lose their potency after about a year, but their flavor will deteriorate faster if stored improperly. Keep them in airtight, light-proof containers, away from heat.

Choose an accessible drawer or cabinet or a wall-mounted rack do not hang it above the cooktop. Only hardy vegetables such as potatoes , onions, and garlic should be stored in your pantry. Potatoes should not be refrigerated; keep up to two weeks' worth in baskets or bins in a cool, dry, dark, well-ventilated spot.

Take them out of plastic, which can encourage mold, Keep onions , shallots, and garlic in the pantry for up to one month—do not refrigerate them. Store each vegetable in a separate basket or bin; it's especially important to keep potatoes and onions apart since they can cause each other to spoil.

Dried mushrooms are a multi-tasking ingredient that brings savory, umami flavor to soups, stews, and risotto. Store dried wild mushrooms in airtight containers in a dark cool place like your pantry. They will last for two to three years if stored correctly. Having everything you'd need to whip up a batch of cookies or a cake is a good idea.

Store ingredients in airtight containers, away from heat and light sources. Extracts, like pure vanilla or almond, will last several years; leavenings like baking soda and baking powder lose their potency after about one year; pay attention to their expiration dates.

Whether for baking a dessert or breading chicken for dinner, flour is a pantry essential. We suggest keeping a few varieties on hand, including all-purpose, which, as its name suggests, is the go-to for all kinds of uses, from thickening sauces to making a birthday cake.

Store wheat flours in airtight containers at room temperature for up to one year. Choose containers with wide mouths for easy scooping and measuring. Freeze almond and other nut flours for up to six months. Humidity can make solid sugars lumpy, so stow them in well-sealed containers in a cool, dry spot.

Double-wrap brown sugars to keep them moist. Store syrups at room temperature in their original containers for up to one year. Keeping olive oil in the fridge can extend the life of an open bottle for at least a year.

The oil might become cloudy and thick, but the taste won't be affected. With nut oils sesame, walnut, grape seed , expect six to eight months before they start to go bad — even in the fridge.

Heat and light are the enemies, so if you must keep oil by the stove, put it into small containers that will be emptied quickly.

For more great meal ideas and grocery tips, please sign up for our free newsletters. Nuts contain oil and, like oils, can turn rancid and taste funny. The life expectancy of nuts stored in the pantry is just a few weeks, but they last up to a year in the freezer.

Processed nut butters, such as peanut butter, last longer in the pantry than nuts — up to a year for an unopened jar and a few months after opening. Natural nut butters without preservatives have a shorter shelf life and should be stored in the fridge after opening, for up to six months.

It's sometimes worthwhile to buy those giant containers of herbs and spices when you find a good deal. Dried, whole leaf herbs such as thyme, oregano, and rosemary retain their flavor for up to three years, but anything ground or powdered has a much shorter shelf life.

Keep dried herbs far from light, heat, and dampness but never in the fridge, where they might absorb odors. Salt lasts indefinitely, and whole peppercorns hold their potency for a few years. Keep both away from moisture. Other whole spices, such as cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon sticks, maintain flavor for a long time but rarely go on sale.

Mustard, ketchup, horseradish, sriracha, and other condiments go on sale frequently and stay potent for at least six months after being opened. Although salad dressings and mayonnaise should be used up a little more quickly once the seal is broken, unopened bottles keep for quite a while, so buy several if storage space isn't an issue.

While most dairy products have a short shelf life, there are some you should feel free to buy in bulk and freeze. Hard, semi-hard, and aged cheeses such as cheddar, Monterey Jack, and Parmesan can be frozen successfully for up to four months if you wrap them well.

It's best to grate or cook with cheese that's been frozen, rather than eat it on crackers or a sandwich. Butter freezes well and keeps for up to a year. Eggs can be frozen for up to six months, if they are scrambled lightly with a bit of salt and put into freezer containers.

When a sale hits, fill your shopping basket with frozen fruits and vegetables. We think it's safe to say that you're the love language of many Freebs, too! This pantry staple is another one that will go with just about anything and it's cheap and easy to keep on hand.

Pro Tip: When you're cooking pasta, don't use oil in your water for boiling. A lot of Freebs keep canned pasta sauce on hand as it pairs naturally with pasta. It's a pantry staple that is pretty cheap to stock up on and can go in lots of different things!

Pro Tip: Pasta sauce is basically canned tomato sauce and some seasonings, so stock up on tomato sauce and you can easily make your own pasta sauce in a pinch! Tomatoes are another pantry staple that a lot of Freebs keep on hand! Whether they're canned tomatoes, or tomato paste or sauce, there are so many different recipes you can make with them!

Don't be afraid to doctor your tomato sauces with fresh herbs, garlic, cheeses, or thickeners to get the results you want. You can even combined tomato sauce with paste for a slightly different take that uses up both ingredients. Now that you have some ideas about how to use up those delicious canned and jarred tomato soups, sauces, and pastes, let's talk beans!

Whether they're canned or whole, beans are good for so many things! Eat them plain, add them to meat to bulk up the meal, add them to a soup…. Those are just a few of the reasons that beans are one of the top pantry staples for the Freebs!

You can even use your leftover canned beans in easy peasy dishes like my tamale casserole! Beans are a delicious filler and add protein and other nutrients!

These soups are so good to have on hand. They go with pretty much anything and can really help to take a few ingredients from being a random assortment of items to a casserole in no time!

Pro Tip: It is beyond easy to make your own cream of chicken soup if you keep broth on hand — just add milk, flour , and a little seasoning! Genius, right!? These are an obvious pantry staple! They're great to have by themselves as a side or added to a recipe. Pro Tip: To improve the flavor of canned vegetables, first rinse them in a colander under cold water.

Then add to your recipes as usual. Whether it's beef, chicken, or vegetable, broth and stock are great pantry staples to keep on hand!

21 Cheap Pantry Staples List on a Limited Budget | The Frugal Gene Was this page helpful? Toggle Menu Close. Since our goal is to grow as much food as we can, gardening only outside will…. Accept All Reject All Show Purposes. Dried fruits can be stored at room temperature for six months to a year, but they last longer if kept well sealed in the refrigerator, which preserves freshness and prevents stickiness.
10 Pantry and Freezer Staples Worth Buying in Bulk

FROZEN VEGGIES Often much cheaper than fresh veggies, the other handy thing about frozen ones is that they last much longer! I use them a lot as a side dish and also in recipes like my Easy Chicken Pot Pie , Cheesy Ham, Potato and Green Bean Bake and Easy Vegetable Beef Soup.

CHICKEN Probably the cheapest kind of meat there is and super versatile too! A few chicken recipes that we enjoy: Herb Roasted Chicken and Potatoes , One Pan Chicken and Rice , Creamy Crockpot Mexican Chicken and Homemade Shake and Bake Chicken. In casseroles or soups, I often can get by with using less than the amount called for.

A few ground beef recipes that we really like: Crockpot Tamale Pie and Super Easy Sloppy Joes. It helps me be frugal because I can buy in bulk when food is on sale becoming less and less, it seems, these days , portion it and freeze for later.

Yes, I love stocking up and freezing items that are on sale too! Such a great way to save. I so agree with you. We have worn out many vacuum food sealers over the years. Our son upgraded so he can vacuum seal whole chickens raised on his property. We opted for a slightly smaller model and use it daily.

when canning diced tomatoes can I pressure can them in stead of water bath? If so how long to pressure can? Yes, you can definitely pressure can them! As for how long, it will depend on your pressure canner and altitude. I would look in the instruction manual that came with the pressure canner and go by what it says there.

I would follow that. Tomatoes also freeze well! Either whole or diced or roasted. Consider that especially when your garden is at its peak. I would add celery to that list as I use it in making stews.

Onions, carrots and celery is your mirre poir for all basic stews. Yes, celery is a great pantry staple, for sure! Never heard of strained tomatoes but canned tomato products of any kind are handy to have, I think.

This is one of my favorite ways to save on cheese too. Great list! A tip on keeping garlic longer — I buy the 3 packs of bulbs from Aldi and immediately put them in a small ziplock kept in the freezer.

It keeps a long time that way!!! Ready to mince, etc. I also keep Panko bread crumbs in the freezer as I use them in a variety of recipes. Lime juice gets used in marinades, etc.

and lemon juice is frequently used as well, not only desserts, but certain salad dressings too. Final note, this is not going to work for everyone, but try to hunt out whether or not there is a good local butcher shop in your area. Or at least within reasonable driving distance. I make a few trips a year and stock the freezer with various meats.

Got a great deal on those and they worked just fine for recipes that called for bacon bits or a bit of chopped bacon — just froze them and pulled out what I needed. I never knew you could freeze garlic! That is totally going to change my life. Thank you! And I started keeping my bread crumbs in the freezer too.

Want to stay in touch and talk all things outdoorsy? Theme by HB-Themes. Buy in bulk if you can Especially on non-perishables that last a while, or starches like potatoes. you can make your own granola at home easily with oats and a few ingredients—and it will likely be less sugar-heavy as a bonus!

Brand-name when store brand is equally good, for things like rice, canned goods, etc. Specialty products: for example, rice, quinoa, etc are cheaper and fine options vs gluten-free bread, for instance All organic: you can look at the Dirty Dozen list by the environmental working group if you want to choose which things to buy organic Other Hacks Most of the time, not wasting money is a balancing act of getting creative in the kitchen while not wasting any food.

At the end of each week, consider doing a kitchen sink soup with all of your leftover veggies, and make something tasty with any wilting fruit apple crumble, banana bread, tarts, etc.

Super healthy, and super inexpensive, especially if you use dried beans as your protein. You can easily make bread, pizza crusts, cookies, and pretty much any baked good you want rather than buying them from the store.

My easy sourdough recipe is here and literally is just flour and water. That means trying to DIY things like salad dressing, granola, etc. Share this: Twitter Facebook. About Molly Hurford Molly Hurford is a journalist in love with all things cycling, running, nutrition and movement-related.

It is best used within one year of purchase. Whether you use them as the foundation of a meal or a side, grains, rice , and dried beans are versatile pantry staples, which is why we always keep them at the ready.

Dried items, except cornmeal, can be stored in the pantry for up to one year. To discourage pests, keep cornmeal in the freezer for up to one year. A variety of oils and vinegars are essential to any well-functioning kitchen.

Whether you use them for stir fries or in marinades or dressings, it's important to have cooking oil options. Store vegetable oils in the original bottles, unrefrigerated, in a cool, dark place for up to six months.

Refrigerate nut oils such as walnut oil , and use within three months. Do not store oils next to the stove. Keep all types of vinegar in their original bottles, and store them in a cool spot for up to one year. Maintain a well-rounded collection of the spices , herbs, and seasonings you use most frequently—choices will vary from household to household, but every cook relies on them to elevate or enhance a dish.

Most spices will lose their potency after about a year, but their flavor will deteriorate faster if stored improperly. Keep them in airtight, light-proof containers, away from heat.

Choose an accessible drawer or cabinet or a wall-mounted rack do not hang it above the cooktop. Only hardy vegetables such as potatoes , onions, and garlic should be stored in your pantry.

Potatoes should not be refrigerated; keep up to two weeks' worth in baskets or bins in a cool, dry, dark, well-ventilated spot. Take them out of plastic, which can encourage mold, Keep onions , shallots, and garlic in the pantry for up to one month—do not refrigerate them.

Store each vegetable in a separate basket or bin; it's especially important to keep potatoes and onions apart since they can cause each other to spoil. Dried mushrooms are a multi-tasking ingredient that brings savory, umami flavor to soups, stews, and risotto.

Store dried wild mushrooms in airtight containers in a dark cool place like your pantry. They will last for two to three years if stored correctly. Having everything you'd need to whip up a batch of cookies or a cake is a good idea.

Store ingredients in airtight containers, away from heat and light sources. Extracts, like pure vanilla or almond, will last several years; leavenings like baking soda and baking powder lose their potency after about one year; pay attention to their expiration dates.

Whether for baking a dessert or breading chicken for dinner, flour is a pantry essential. We suggest keeping a few varieties on hand, including all-purpose, which, as its name suggests, is the go-to for all kinds of uses, from thickening sauces to making a birthday cake.

Store wheat flours in airtight containers at room temperature for up to one year. Choose containers with wide mouths for easy scooping and measuring. Freeze almond and other nut flours for up to six months.

Discounted pantry staples

Discounted pantry staples -

So, thank you!!! It was really fun reading through all of your favorite pantry staples and the ways you use them. While we got a TON of responses, there were two items that really stood out from the rest. Can you guess what they were?

If you guessed rice and pasta, then you were spot on! A grand total of Freebs voted these as their top pantry staples. Crazy, huh? Read on to learn what their favorite uses are. Rice is one of those pantry staples that pretty much goes with anything!

It's a great way to stretch a meal, especially if you have some ravenous teenagers or toddlers! in the house. Pro Tip: Use a rice cooker or Instant Pot to cook your rice quicker if it needs to be cooked before going into a recipe.

Oh pasta, you are our love language! We think it's safe to say that you're the love language of many Freebs, too! This pantry staple is another one that will go with just about anything and it's cheap and easy to keep on hand. Pro Tip: When you're cooking pasta, don't use oil in your water for boiling.

A lot of Freebs keep canned pasta sauce on hand as it pairs naturally with pasta. It's a pantry staple that is pretty cheap to stock up on and can go in lots of different things! Pro Tip: Pasta sauce is basically canned tomato sauce and some seasonings, so stock up on tomato sauce and you can easily make your own pasta sauce in a pinch!

Tomatoes are another pantry staple that a lot of Freebs keep on hand! Whether they're canned tomatoes, or tomato paste or sauce, there are so many different recipes you can make with them!

Don't be afraid to doctor your tomato sauces with fresh herbs, garlic, cheeses, or thickeners to get the results you want. You can even combined tomato sauce with paste for a slightly different take that uses up both ingredients. Now that you have some ideas about how to use up those delicious canned and jarred tomato soups, sauces, and pastes, let's talk beans!

Whether they're canned or whole, beans are good for so many things! In an ideal world, you would build up a prepared pantry over time, by adding a few extra items each time you go grocery shopping.

You can add variety in with your herbs and spices, while keeping the main portions of your meals basic staples. Specialty ingredients are more expensive, so keeping your meals simple will help you save money.

Think about the top foods your family eats each week and buy the shelf-stable versions. For example, canned or dried fruit instead of fresh.

So if your family eats peaches, consider stocking canned peaches. If your family eats chicken, buy canned chicken. Obviously, if there was an emergency situation or a circumstance like a job loss or significant increase in grocery costs, and you need to eat from your pantry for awhile, you may need to alter your meals a little bit.

The price of food per pound or ounce decreases significantly when you can buy items in bulk. If these items are stored and sealed well you can see all my recommendations for pantry storage HERE , they can often keep for a long time.

But if there are grains oats, rice, flour, wheat berries, etc. that you can afford to buy in bulk right now, buy them. The price will very likely increase in the next few months, and grains may be harder to come by.

This post will give you lots of details about how to store your bulk foods. Meats can be one of the most expensive parts of your meal.

I will make a whole chicken one day for dinner, eat some for lunch the next day, and use the rest in a pot pie or stir fry for the next dinner. Sometimes we can even stretch the meat even further depending on how hungry the kids were the first day ;.

Buying your meat in bulk and canning or freezing it can also save money. Using alternative protein sources is a great way to stretch your budget. We like to keep shelf stable proteins on hand like beans, canned chicken, canned salmon, quinoa, and hemp heart seeds. Buy dry beans in bulk to save even more!

Click here for recipes. Premade items are generally more expensive than if you are going to buy the ingredients to make those things yourself. Buying bread is going to be more expensive than making your own sourdough.

So if you can switch from convenience items to homemade, even a handful of items, you will be able to make a dent in your budget. There is a belief that canned or frozen food is not as nutritious as fresh foods.

But while the textures of course change, the nutrition is often not as compromised as we think. If foods are preserved properly, their nutritional value can still be quite significant! Many things that we deem as waste are actually useful! Apple scraps can be used to make vinegar, citrus peels can be used to make home cleaners, and bones and veggie scraps can be used to make broth.

Bacon grease can be saved for cooking. This saves money on buying other items and cuts down on waste in general. You can also feed many animals food scraps. We give a lot of ours to the chickens especially the bits of cereal and oatmeal that my kids abandon at breakfast.

Food waste can also be tossed into the compost bin and turned into good soil over time. Good compost is also expensive, so you can save money by making your own. This goes along with the previous suggestion, because you can preserve your leftovers or foods that are on their way to going bad.

If you make an extra large batch of soup or chili, put half into the freezer so that the next time you need a quick meal, you can just pull that out instead of buying takeout.

When you buy fresh foods in bulk, preserve half of it! This goes for foods you buy or foods you grow yourself. Honestly this is my top recommendation, especially as we go into the growing season.

Learning how to stock a pantry on a budget can be tricky. When money is tight, the last thing you want to do is spend money on extra things to create a frugal pantry. But, learning how to build up your pantry will actually save you money in the long run and even work up to how do you stock a pantry for 3 months and beyond.

Of course, your pantry staples to stock up on a budget may look a little different than our pantry list based on your dietary needs and food likes and dislikes. So think about those things when learning how to stock your pantry on a budget. So give careful consideration to what to put on your essential food items on a budget list!

It will give you a better understanding of why we recommended these for pantry staples! Once you build up your pantry food storage, you can even start saving money with once a month grocery shopping!

TIP: Allow your pantry storage to build up for a few months before you start using it. Remember: the goal of stocking a pantry is so you have extra food you can rely on to stretch your money or for emergency purposes!

Need containers for pantry storage?

Discounted pantry staples sgaples are tempting sgaples to stock up on groceries, and warehouse clubs such as Costco Frozen food sale items large quantities oantry food for low per-unit prices. Smart Sample chapters online who buy panhry bulk Discouhted set themselves up for plenty of cheap meals and "pantry shopping" when money or time is short. But no matter how appealing the prices, you waste money when you buy more food than your family will eat before it spoils, and some items have shorter shelf lives than you might think. Here are 10 foods you can buy in bulk confidently. Related: Emergency Supplies to Stock Up On at Costco and Sam's.

Author: Dohn

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